BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

During the last Los Angeles Auto Show, one of the vehicles that really drew our attention wasn’t a car.

Actually, it was the BMW S1000R – which, at the time – we presumed to be a naked S1000RR without all the race fixin’s.

Fast forward to March 2015 and we suddenly find ourselves wondering whatever happened to that bike?  Was it highly reviewed?  Did people like it?

BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

The first review we liked was this one from GizMag:

The tester loved the fact the S1000R had cruise control (yep, cruise control) and liked it much better than the S1000RR (blasphemy?).

We also found this first ride review from CycleWorld.com:

Although some might point out that the S1000R has less horsepower than the S1000RR, it fully makes up for it with its broad range of increased torque. If you’ve ever put handlebars on a literbike, you already know the smarts behind this; a sit-up riding position puts the rider’s weight farther back and peaky power becomes unusable. Additionally, 160 hp is nothing to get depressed about; it’s still a damn good bit of power and it’s still nearly impossible to legally take the throttle on this bike to its stop in any gear. And if you can’t do wheelies effortlessly on this bike, you can’t do wheelies.

The S1000R has nicely neutral steering, and it finds its way around the tightest corners without any negative tendencies. The smooth brakes can be comfortably trailed to midcorner. Rolling on the power shoots the machine out of the turns, yet this BMW holds its line. There’s no compromise found here.

All things considered, BMW has created a 455-pound motorcycle, with 160 hp, that is remarkably easy to ride. That’s saying a lot. I mean, 20 years ago an AMA Superbike barely had 160 hp. From the thicker seat to the throttle-by-wire to the brakes and dynamic suspension, the S1000R provides comfort and confidence from slow, tight turns to racetrack speeds. It’s easy to ride this bike well, which is a tribute to the seamless melding of its mechanical achievement and technical programming. Every input takes a soft touch, from the switches to the levers to the throttle, requiring barely any movement for instant response. The transmission is so notch on, it just might be impossible to miss a shift. One day of riding was not enough.

From RR to R, gone is the scream, replaced by a grunt. For the street, that’s nothing but good. With the BMW S1000R, it’s not about how fast you can go, but how quickly you can go fast.

And then there was this other video from CycleWorld.com, claiming the S1000R to be the “Best Standard”:

And we love the fact the bike came in black in the video.

BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

So all-in-all it sounds like the S1000R has been highly reviewed, but we wonder how many people actually bought the bike for themselves?

To be honest, we haven’t seen the bike on the road much but that might be because we haven’t been riding ourselves.

All we know is we would definitely do the bike in either black or white and add some bar-end mirrors to make the bike look more gangster.

BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

BMW S1000R image from http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com.

For more information on the BMW S1000R, you can check out BMW’s official website here: http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com/us/en/index.html?content=http://www.bmwmotorcycles.com/us/en/bike/model_overview.html.

ESM

To create Essential Style for Men, mix 2 parts petrol, 1 part secret agent, 1 part rock and roll, 1 part hip-hop and a shot of tequila in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for 20 seconds. Pour into a martini glass rimmed with explosives and have a supermodel serve for all your friends to enjoy.